My grandma lived through ‘unprecedented’: This is what I would ask her

 

My grandmother’s generation is commonly called The Greatest Generation. They, too, faced “unprecedented” crisis in this country — more than once.

Their formative years happened during the Great Depression, when their parents taught them to conserve everything and waste nothing.

Their young adult years happened during World War II, when the government asked them to sacrifice pleasures, liberties and even their lives for the sake of the common good. Rationing of food, metal, rubber and other essential everyday supplies was an accepted part of their existence, as was widespread loss of the nation’s fathers, uncles, brothers and cousins.

Their generation willingly suspended their rights so that the country would be stronger as a whole. Continue reading “My grandma lived through ‘unprecedented’: This is what I would ask her”

Am I wasting my freedom to write? | A challenge from “The Storyteller” by Jodi Picoult

Jodi Picoult’s “The Storyteller” is a hefty hardback boasting well over 450 pages. I picked it up primarily because it centers on a 20-something woman named Sage who forms an unlikely bond with a 90-something man named Josef.

The story promised to strum every heart string I have as a reader: contemporary fiction, intergenerational friendship, a life story revealed, a younger person all the wiser because of it. Yes, please!

But about 100 pages in, I realized this book was going to take me to places I had not anticipated. “The Storyteller” proved to be a challenge that sliced right to my writing soul.

Turns out, there’s a third character to this story who encompasses a large swath of those 450 pages: Sage’s grandmother, Mika, a Holocaust survivor. Continue reading “Am I wasting my freedom to write? | A challenge from “The Storyteller” by Jodi Picoult”